Number 15, the last of it’s type ever made. The Apollo Saturn V Moon rocket was comprised of three stages. This first stage, referred to as the S-IC, was the most powerful section of the rocket. S-IC-15 was built with the intention of a Moon mission, but was ultimately used as a backup for the Skylab Space Station launcher.
     Once number 15 was completed, it marked the end of the Apollo era at NASA Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, where she was built, and where she proudly stands today. I was recently able to take a behind the scenes tour of Michoud for Project Habu, and photographed her up close.
     While I was photographing, a number of dragonflies were flitting about around me. One was gracious enough to momentarily pose for me on a barbed wire fence near the rocket. It was an opportunity to capture two incredible flying machines together. It’s amazing how far we’ve come in the last century, from looking at flying animals and dreaming about putting ourselves in the air, to riding atop a column of 7.5 million pounds of thrust, bound for the Moon.      Number 15, the last of it’s type ever made. The Apollo Saturn V Moon rocket was comprised of three stages. This first stage, referred to as the S-IC, was the most powerful section of the rocket. S-IC-15 was built with the intention of a Moon mission, but was ultimately used as a backup for the Skylab Space Station launcher.
     Once number 15 was completed, it marked the end of the Apollo era at NASA Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, where she was built, and where she proudly stands today. I was recently able to take a behind the scenes tour of Michoud for Project Habu, and photographed her up close.
     While I was photographing, a number of dragonflies were flitting about around me. One was gracious enough to momentarily pose for me on a barbed wire fence near the rocket. It was an opportunity to capture two incredible flying machines together. It’s amazing how far we’ve come in the last century, from looking at flying animals and dreaming about putting ourselves in the air, to riding atop a column of 7.5 million pounds of thrust, bound for the Moon.      Number 15, the last of it’s type ever made. The Apollo Saturn V Moon rocket was comprised of three stages. This first stage, referred to as the S-IC, was the most powerful section of the rocket. S-IC-15 was built with the intention of a Moon mission, but was ultimately used as a backup for the Skylab Space Station launcher.
     Once number 15 was completed, it marked the end of the Apollo era at NASA Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, where she was built, and where she proudly stands today. I was recently able to take a behind the scenes tour of Michoud for Project Habu, and photographed her up close.
     While I was photographing, a number of dragonflies were flitting about around me. One was gracious enough to momentarily pose for me on a barbed wire fence near the rocket. It was an opportunity to capture two incredible flying machines together. It’s amazing how far we’ve come in the last century, from looking at flying animals and dreaming about putting ourselves in the air, to riding atop a column of 7.5 million pounds of thrust, bound for the Moon.      Number 15, the last of it’s type ever made. The Apollo Saturn V Moon rocket was comprised of three stages. This first stage, referred to as the S-IC, was the most powerful section of the rocket. S-IC-15 was built with the intention of a Moon mission, but was ultimately used as a backup for the Skylab Space Station launcher.
     Once number 15 was completed, it marked the end of the Apollo era at NASA Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, where she was built, and where she proudly stands today. I was recently able to take a behind the scenes tour of Michoud for Project Habu, and photographed her up close.
     While I was photographing, a number of dragonflies were flitting about around me. One was gracious enough to momentarily pose for me on a barbed wire fence near the rocket. It was an opportunity to capture two incredible flying machines together. It’s amazing how far we’ve come in the last century, from looking at flying animals and dreaming about putting ourselves in the air, to riding atop a column of 7.5 million pounds of thrust, bound for the Moon.      Number 15, the last of it’s type ever made. The Apollo Saturn V Moon rocket was comprised of three stages. This first stage, referred to as the S-IC, was the most powerful section of the rocket. S-IC-15 was built with the intention of a Moon mission, but was ultimately used as a backup for the Skylab Space Station launcher.
     Once number 15 was completed, it marked the end of the Apollo era at NASA Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, where she was built, and where she proudly stands today. I was recently able to take a behind the scenes tour of Michoud for Project Habu, and photographed her up close.
     While I was photographing, a number of dragonflies were flitting about around me. One was gracious enough to momentarily pose for me on a barbed wire fence near the rocket. It was an opportunity to capture two incredible flying machines together. It’s amazing how far we’ve come in the last century, from looking at flying animals and dreaming about putting ourselves in the air, to riding atop a column of 7.5 million pounds of thrust, bound for the Moon.      Number 15, the last of it’s type ever made. The Apollo Saturn V Moon rocket was comprised of three stages. This first stage, referred to as the S-IC, was the most powerful section of the rocket. S-IC-15 was built with the intention of a Moon mission, but was ultimately used as a backup for the Skylab Space Station launcher.
     Once number 15 was completed, it marked the end of the Apollo era at NASA Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, where she was built, and where she proudly stands today. I was recently able to take a behind the scenes tour of Michoud for Project Habu, and photographed her up close.
     While I was photographing, a number of dragonflies were flitting about around me. One was gracious enough to momentarily pose for me on a barbed wire fence near the rocket. It was an opportunity to capture two incredible flying machines together. It’s amazing how far we’ve come in the last century, from looking at flying animals and dreaming about putting ourselves in the air, to riding atop a column of 7.5 million pounds of thrust, bound for the Moon.      Number 15, the last of it’s type ever made. The Apollo Saturn V Moon rocket was comprised of three stages. This first stage, referred to as the S-IC, was the most powerful section of the rocket. S-IC-15 was built with the intention of a Moon mission, but was ultimately used as a backup for the Skylab Space Station launcher.
     Once number 15 was completed, it marked the end of the Apollo era at NASA Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, where she was built, and where she proudly stands today. I was recently able to take a behind the scenes tour of Michoud for Project Habu, and photographed her up close.
     While I was photographing, a number of dragonflies were flitting about around me. One was gracious enough to momentarily pose for me on a barbed wire fence near the rocket. It was an opportunity to capture two incredible flying machines together. It’s amazing how far we’ve come in the last century, from looking at flying animals and dreaming about putting ourselves in the air, to riding atop a column of 7.5 million pounds of thrust, bound for the Moon.      Number 15, the last of it’s type ever made. The Apollo Saturn V Moon rocket was comprised of three stages. This first stage, referred to as the S-IC, was the most powerful section of the rocket. S-IC-15 was built with the intention of a Moon mission, but was ultimately used as a backup for the Skylab Space Station launcher.
     Once number 15 was completed, it marked the end of the Apollo era at NASA Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, where she was built, and where she proudly stands today. I was recently able to take a behind the scenes tour of Michoud for Project Habu, and photographed her up close.
     While I was photographing, a number of dragonflies were flitting about around me. One was gracious enough to momentarily pose for me on a barbed wire fence near the rocket. It was an opportunity to capture two incredible flying machines together. It’s amazing how far we’ve come in the last century, from looking at flying animals and dreaming about putting ourselves in the air, to riding atop a column of 7.5 million pounds of thrust, bound for the Moon.      Number 15, the last of it’s type ever made. The Apollo Saturn V Moon rocket was comprised of three stages. This first stage, referred to as the S-IC, was the most powerful section of the rocket. S-IC-15 was built with the intention of a Moon mission, but was ultimately used as a backup for the Skylab Space Station launcher.
     Once number 15 was completed, it marked the end of the Apollo era at NASA Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, where she was built, and where she proudly stands today. I was recently able to take a behind the scenes tour of Michoud for Project Habu, and photographed her up close.
     While I was photographing, a number of dragonflies were flitting about around me. One was gracious enough to momentarily pose for me on a barbed wire fence near the rocket. It was an opportunity to capture two incredible flying machines together. It’s amazing how far we’ve come in the last century, from looking at flying animals and dreaming about putting ourselves in the air, to riding atop a column of 7.5 million pounds of thrust, bound for the Moon.      Number 15, the last of it’s type ever made. The Apollo Saturn V Moon rocket was comprised of three stages. This first stage, referred to as the S-IC, was the most powerful section of the rocket. S-IC-15 was built with the intention of a Moon mission, but was ultimately used as a backup for the Skylab Space Station launcher.
     Once number 15 was completed, it marked the end of the Apollo era at NASA Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, where she was built, and where she proudly stands today. I was recently able to take a behind the scenes tour of Michoud for Project Habu, and photographed her up close.
     While I was photographing, a number of dragonflies were flitting about around me. One was gracious enough to momentarily pose for me on a barbed wire fence near the rocket. It was an opportunity to capture two incredible flying machines together. It’s amazing how far we’ve come in the last century, from looking at flying animals and dreaming about putting ourselves in the air, to riding atop a column of 7.5 million pounds of thrust, bound for the Moon.

     Number 15, the last of it’s type ever made. The Apollo Saturn V Moon rocket was comprised of three stages. This first stage, referred to as the S-IC, was the most powerful section of the rocket. S-IC-15 was built with the intention of a Moon mission, but was ultimately used as a backup for the Skylab Space Station launcher.

     Once number 15 was completed, it marked the end of the Apollo era at NASA Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, where she was built, and where she proudly stands today. I was recently able to take a behind the scenes tour of Michoud for Project Habu, and photographed her up close.

     While I was photographing, a number of dragonflies were flitting about around me. One was gracious enough to momentarily pose for me on a barbed wire fence near the rocket. It was an opportunity to capture two incredible flying machines together. It’s amazing how far we’ve come in the last century, from looking at flying animals and dreaming about putting ourselves in the air, to riding atop a column of 7.5 million pounds of thrust, bound for the Moon.